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Quick Switch Capo - Black

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The Basic Chords

If you would like to learn chords to over 1,000,000 million songs, check out the Basic Chords.

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Quick Switch Two Pack

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The Combo Pack for Bass

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How do you use a capo?

Enjoy the following video tutorial which teaches you how to use a capo:

Every song has the key that it was written and recorded in, but an artist may wish to change the key that he or she plays a particular song in without changing the melody. Why would anyone want to do this? Well everyone has a specific range that he or she is comfortable singing in depending on his or her voice type. And sometimes, a singer needs to change the key in order to play the song in a key that is more suitable to his or her vocal abilities and natural range. This is where a capo comes in handy.

If a song is played using open chords (the chords that you play toward the bottom of the neck with open strings - in other words not bar chords), then that entire song can be easily 'transposed' instantaneously by using a capo.

What is a capo?

The goal of using a capo is to be able to change the key that you are playing a song in quickly without thinking. What is a key? A key is essentially a group of permissible notes and chords that 'go together' according to the western traditions in music, which have been in development for thousands of years. Without getting into too much detail, basically, a key signature, or key, designates which chords can be played and sound good together. With that background, let's return back to the question at hand...what is a capo?

Every song has the key that it was written and recorded in, but an artist may wish to change the key that he or she plays a particular song in without changing the melody. Why would anyone want to do this? Well everyone has a specific range that he or she is comfortable singing in depending on his or her voice type. And sometimes, a singer needs to change the key in order to play the song in a key that is more suitable to his or her vocal abilities and natural range. This is where a capo comes in handy.

If a song is played using open chords (the chords that you play toward the bottom of the neck with open strings - in other words not bar chords), then that entire song can be easily 'transposed' instantaneously by using a capo.

How does a capo work?

To understand how a capo works, think of this simple observation. The bottom end of the guitar neck is split from the head (where the tuners are) with a device called 'the nut.' The nut is a strip of plastic or wood that essentially gives the open strings their pitch. By placing a capo on various points of the fretboard, you can essentially raise this open string pitch. You are in effect raising the position of 'the nut', thereby changing the open string tuning. With this new starting point for the open string pitch, one simply has to move the open chord positions relative to the new starting point to transpose the song.

Say, for example, you are playing a song that starts on the open C chord. Now assume you want to transpose the song and raise the pitch three half steps. You could simply play the C chord three steps up from where you would ordinarily play it, but notice that the open string notes in the C chord do not automatically raise (only the notes that you depress with your articulator hand raise). Thus it is no longer sounding like a C chord. Aha, that is where the capo comes in. If you place the capo three frets up from the end of the bridge, that compensates for the open string position. And in this way, we can now play the C chord and all of the other chords, for that matter, in a new position without the song sounding off. Technically speaking, the C chord is no longer a C chord, but that is ok, because the entire song has been transposed to a new key.

In sum, the capo allows the guitar player to quickly transpose the key of a song he or she is playing by creating a temporary new 'nut' position. If you would like to have this freedom, then you need a capo.

Where can I buy a capo?

There are a lot of great resources online to buy capos, and you can find them at your local guitar store. However we guarantee the best prices on the web for our high quality quick change Fret Daddy capos. If you find a better price (including shipping costs) we will match the difference.

Related Helpful Resources

Are you a beginner guitar player? Check out this video, which explains how to learn the names of the notes of the guitar. This site also has a great video tutorial, which teaches you how to learn the notes of the bass guitar here.

Below is a link to a great lesson for beginners trying to learn how to play guitar chords. Click Here to learn Beginner Guitar Chords

Where can I buy a capo?

There are a lot of great resources online to buy capos, and you can find them at your local guitar store. However we guarantee the best prices on the web for our high quality quick change Fret Daddy capos. If you find a better price (including shipping costs) we will match the difference.